Thursday, May 26, 2016

Psychology and the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS)?

I got to sit by a friend at a meeting today and we chatted about the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). He shared this article with me - it describes these 8 "practices of science," and I started wondering about whether they might apply in Psychology classrooms, and if so, how?

1. Asking questions (for science) and defining problems (for engineering)
2. Developing and using models


3. Planning and carrying out investigations

4. Analyzing and interpreting data
5. Using mathematics and computational thinking


6. Constructing explanations (for science) and designing solutions (for engineering) 
7. Engaging in argument from evidence

8. Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information

The science classes taught in science departments in my district are getting redesigned using these 8 practices. I like our current national standards for high school psychology, and I don't propose changing them to "meet" the NGSS, but I'm curious about whether or not these science "practices" might apply to psych classes in interesting ways. Any thoughts? Are the NGSS a big deal in your districts? Does anyone think we psychology teachers should pay attention to NGSS?



posted by Rob McEntarffer

5 comments:

Debra Park said...

Yes they do apply and all 8 can be correlated with the existing National Standards for HS Psychology.

Debra Park said...

Yes they do apply and all 8 can be correlated with the existing National Standards for HS Psychology.

Erin A said...

I've done the "course equivalency" for AP Psych as a science course and aligned it to the NGSS (I have a science endorsement). We do more "science" (according to the NGSS) than gets done in a typical Human Anatomy class, but still I can't get this class covered as a "Science" class so I can teach it. I can send it around if anyone wants to see it.

Erin A said...

I've done the "course equivalency" for AP Psych as a science course and aligned it to the NGSS (I have a science endorsement). We do more "science" (according to the NGSS) than gets done in a typical Human Anatomy class, but still I can't get this class covered as a "Science" class so I can teach it. I can send it around if anyone wants to see it.

Sachin Shah said...

Hi Everyone
I am a science teacher at the high school level and I am a psychology major and the university that I went to viewed pyschology as a hard science due to the brain based and using animal and human models to understand behavior. The major took a bio-social perspective and also a bio-behavioral perspective. We had 2 laboratories- EEG, perception, and comparative psychology lab. I learned more about the human body and the cell as a psychology major. I learned a lot more chemistry due to the Na and K pump in the nerve cell. I think that we need to band together to promote psychology as a science.